VIRTUAL COLLECTION OF ASIAN MASTERPIECES

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13Story

26 October 2016
National Museum of Mongolia-Prehistory
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|  17-Early 20th Century Mongolia  |  Socialist Mongolia 1921-1900 |  Democratic Mongolia 1990-  

 

Prehistory of Mongolia

 

Paleolithic

The Paleolithic was the earliest part of the Stone Age, when early human beings made chipped-stone tools. Ancient man also used bones, horns and the incisors of large animals as tools. The oldest prehistoric artifacts in Mongolia are the stone tools recovered from Tsagaan Agui, or White Cave in Bayanhongor aimag, which date back to nearly 800,000BCE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stone Tool

Paleolithic Period
800,000 – 120,000 BCE
White Cave, Bayanlig, Bayankhongor

 

Bronze Age

During the Bronze Age, artifacts with animal designs became widespread throughout Eurasia. The handle of this dagger-terminating in the shape of a wild mountain sheep's head-is an example of the classic "animal style" art found in Bronze Age Mongolia. Similar representation depicting rams, ibex, argal wild sheep, and other animals, can be traced as far back as Stone Age rock paintings. This exquisite artifact is registered on the list of Mongolian National Treasures.

                                              

 

 

                                                                                                                   

Bronze Dagger
National Treasure
44 x 3.7 cm
Bronze Age 1200 - 900 BCE
Khovd
 
                                             
 
 
 
   
                                                                                                             
Bronze Cauldron
Early Iron Age
700 - 400 BCE
Kharmaan River, Khuvsgul
 
  Bowl-shaped bronze cauldrons such as this have been commonly recovered from South Siberia, from archaeological contexts belonging to the Scythian culture (7th - 5th centuries BCE). However, these ancient cauldrons have also been found throughout central Asia, Mongolia and northern China. The earliest of these is dated to the 8th century BCE, found in China. As central Eurasian people migrated and settled near the Black Sea, these cauldrons also spread west across the continent. During the Hunnu period, bowl-shaped cauldrons were popularly used in Mongolia, and are commonly found in Hunnu burials. This type of artifact is thus commonly known as the “Hunnu cauldron” in Mongolia.

 

Iron Age

Bronze Caudron

Early Iron Age

700-400 BCE

Kharmaan River, Khuvsgul

 

 

Mesolithic

Known as mankind's Great Migration, this period of human history saw people move northwards across the continent. People created bows and arrows, and began to domesticate plants and animals. Mesolithic archaeological remains and relics are generally very rare, in Mongolia and throughout the world.

 

Neolithic

During the Neolithic period, people began to bury their dead by placing them in a seated position in speical undergroudn holes, reflecting a belief in an afterlife. Burial sites such as this have been found in the eastern areas of Mongolia.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Necklace
Neolithic
4000 - 3000 BCE
Length 48 cm
Bone, deer, boar’s teeth, tusk & stone
Woman’s Grave, Tamsagbulag, Dornod

 

 Home      
|  Prehistory of Mongolia |  Ancient States    
|  Traditional Clothing and Jewelry |  Mongolian Empire |  Traditional Culture of Mongolia |  Traditional Life of Mongolia
|  17-Early 20th Century Mongolia  |  Socialist Mongolia 1921-1900 |  Democratic Mongolia 1990-  

 

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