VIRTUAL COLLECTION OF ASIAN MASTERPIECES

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Kimono depicting the game of blind-man’s-buff
19976 I
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Why this is a
Masterpiece

Married women wore the kimono of edozuma type, where the decoration was confined to the lower part (from kneels to hemline) and sleeves, with larger part of fabric’s surface preserving the nominal ground. Such is the decoration of kimono from the Museum’s collection. Genre scenes made under apparent influence of classical Japanese woodblock prints are rather uncommon to kimono paintings. Of special interest are the designs in round cartouches, which look like quotations, transferred from prints all in all. Such example of interaction between different art forms is typical for Japanese urban culture.

History of the Object
In the Edo period a unique concern for artistic value of kimono was developed, and it was selected and appraised aesthetically as a painting while purchasing. Despite the uniformity of kimono shape, a vast diversity of decoration techniques, such as juden, or delineation of rice paste with slim wand, norizome, or batik technique, kaga yuzen or coloring through paper stencils, knot dyeing, etc., existed.

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Type
Textile 
Materials
Silk, juzen handmade painting 
Measurements
L. 161 cm, w. 136 cm. 
Creator name
 
Creator date
 
Where it was made
Japan 
Geography
Japan 
Time period
- BCE 
Creation date
late 19th – early 20th centuries 
Function
In the Edo period (1603 – 1868) loveliness and allure of a woman were testified not by her face, which was covered by a thick coat of make-up in accordance with the custom, but by beauty of her black glossy hair coiffured fancifully, grace of her movements, and artistic taste of kimono selection. It was traditional dress that distinguished the social status of a Japanese woman, her age, education, and sometimes even signified her mood. Her dress could tell if she was going to Kabuki theatre, preparing to take part in tea ceremony or to pay a visit to her relatives on New Year’s day. 
Acquisition
 
Copyright
The State Museum of Oriental Art 
Acknowledgements
 
Owner
 
Museum
The State Museum of Oriental Art 
Credit line
 

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