VIRTUAL COLLECTION OF ASIAN MASTERPIECES

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An Image of Arya Tara
01.01.031.0000.00021
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Why this is a
Masterpiece

Arya, a Buddhist goddess, sits with the right leg pendant. She has two hands. The right hand is in the varada mudra, and the left hand holds a half-blown lotus in the vitarka mudra. The right leg rests on a lotus springing from the stem of the main lotus throne on which the goddess is seated. Beneath this throne, at the base, is represented Vajrasattva sitting with legs locked, a Vajra in the right hand and a Bell in the left. On the right of the goddess is represented in miniature, the goddess Asokakanta (Marichi) with an asoka leaf in her left hand, the right hand being in the abhaya mudra. The asoka leaf, however, looks like the feather of a pea-cock and the goddess represented may in reality be Mahamayuri and not Asokakanta. To the left of the goddess sits a rather corpulent female deity (Ekajata) with a knife in the right hand and a skull-cup in the left. Miniature figures of eight Taras are seen one above the other in two rows of four—four on the right and four on the left of the goddess. They all hold lotuses with the left hands; the right hands in the abhaya mudra are placed between the breasts. All these goddesses have companions, altogether ten in number. Of the companions only the third on the right side is a female; the rest are males. The first two goddesses on the right side have respectively a lion and an elephant as vahana. A Krittimukha is represented at the top.

History of the Object
As the object is a female Buddhist deity, it goes without saying that it was made for the Buddhist community.

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Type
Sculpture 
Materials
Sand stone 
Measurements
 
Creator name
Unknown 
Creator date
In the eighth century CE 
Where it was made
Unknown 
Geography
Bangladesh 
Time period
BCE 8th century ~ BCE 8th century 
Creation date
In the eighth century CE 
Function
Unknown 
Acquisition
It was dug out at Sukhabaspur village in Munshiganj district, Bangladesh. It was then acquired by the Dhaka Museum (the Bangladesh National Museum since 20 September1983). Not known exactly when it was discovered and acquired. 
Copyright
Bangladesh National Museum 
Acknowledgements
Bangladesh National Museum 
Owner
Bangladesh National Museum 
Museum
Bangladesh National Museum 
Credit line
 

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