VIRTUAL COLLECTION OF ASIAN MASTERPIECES

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Ornament samjak norigae
11688 I
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Why this is a
Masterpiece

Samjak norigae from the Museum’s collection consists of openwork perfume case hyanggap, bangadari pendant with two ear-cleaning sticks, and small dagger jangdo. Perfume case is decorated with the pattern of bamboo leaves, plum flowers, and pine twigs, symbolizing in the Far East the endurance against mundane misfortunes.

History of the Object
Women wore an ornament known as norigae fixing it either to the jacket tie or to the skirt band. Norigae consists of one or several pendants made of different materials and attached to silk braids with decorative knots. At the end it has silk tassels of different colours. Originally it was worn by noble ladies, when they put on ceremonial garments. Subsequently they started wearing more simple pendants in everyday life. At a later date norigae was also added to the dress of the commoners, who usually made use of it at season festivals or at the days of family celebrations. A woman would wear one or another norigae depending on her social status, occasion or season. Jade pendants were preferred in summer, while in spring or autumn amber and cornelian ones took their place. The most popular ornaments were samjak norigae, which had three pendants symbolizing the triad of Heavens, Earth and Man. Traditional Korean clothing had no pockets, so norigae allowed a woman to carry some necessities on her. Samjak norigae from the Museum’s collection consists of openwork perfume case hyanggap, bangadari pendant with two ear-cleaning sticks, and small dagger jangdo. Perfume case is decorated with the pattern of bamboo leaves, plum flowers, and pine twigs, symbolizing in the Far East the endurance against mundane misfortunes. Bangadari pendant resembles a human figure portrayed in semiabstract manner, while its designation reminds of one of the traditional occupations of women in old Korea, a work on pearling mill (banga). Jangdo daggers, sometimes used in self-defense, were worn by men and women alike. In norigae they were treated as a symbol of woman’s chastity and fidelity, also serving as protection.

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Type
Costume and Jewelry 
Materials
Silk, nephrite , coral, carving. 
Measurements
 
Creator name
 
Creator date
 
Where it was made
Korea 
Geography
 
Time period
AD 19th century ~ AD 19th century 
Creation date
XIX 
Function
 
Acquisition
 
Copyright
The Sate Museum of Oriental Art 
Acknowledgements
 
Owner
 
Museum
The State Museum of Oriental Art 
Credit line
 

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