VIRTUAL COLLECTION OF ASIAN MASTERPIECES

Add to Favorites

Add to Favorites
Your web browser does not support
Add to Favorites.

Please add the site using your bookmark menu.
The function is available only on Internet Explorer
search a masterpiece

Pig-dragon, chin. Zhulong
MG 18398
Download print email facebook twitter me2day

Why this is a
Masterpiece

One of the most specific characters of the Chinese neolithic period, especially in the north-eastern Hongshan, and south-eastern Liangzhu cultures is its fluent use of jade -- a hard, compact and semi-translucent stone. Neither easy to find nor to carve, it has to be ground with abrasive sands. These challenges notwithstanding, its heavenly colour and translucent quality made jade objects somewhat divine and, as such, protectors against all kinds of evil as well as a harbinger of immortality. Though most of these jades have been found in tombs and some in what seems to be ritual structures linked to fertility cults, their precise function is not yet completely elucidated. The zhulong is a coiled mythical animal with oval eyes, pig’s snout and rounded ears. It most certainly is one of the ancestors of the Chinese dragon. It being representative of the Hongshan jade culture, the prime image of the Chinese dragon, and it being a rather unusual big size, make the Guimet Pig dragon one of the most outstanding neolithic jade objects in western museum collections.

History of the Object
It was part of the personal collection of Dr G. Gieseler, a very quiet and unpretentious research worker who was the first to collect and study Chinese jades in France long before they roused interest there. It was exhibited in London in 1927, then, after the 1932 bequest to the Louvre was again shown in London at the 1935-36 exhibition, then in 1937 at the Paris Orangerie exhibition. In 1945 the collection was handed over to the Guimet Museum as part of an exchange.

Map Of Museums

See the Google map
Type
Sculpture 
Materials
green nephrite, colloquially known as jade 
Measurements
Width 12,5 cm. Height 15,3 cm.  
Creator name
Unknown 
Creator date
Unknown 
Where it was made
China; Northeastern China 
Geography
China 
Time period
BCE 30th century ~ BCE 30th century 
Creation date
BC; c. 3000 BC; neolithic period, Hongshan culture 
Function
indicator of status or harbinger of well-being 
Acquisition
Demise of the Asian Arts collections from the Louvre to the Guimet Museum in 1945. 
Copyright
 
Acknowledgements
 
Owner
State property, France 
Museum
Virtual Museum of the Chinese masterpieces 
Credit line
 

Other
Masterpieces

SEE ALL MASTERPIECES
OF THIS MUSEUM

Show original language

This is your
favorite
Masterpiece ?

Add  your reaction  now !

BACK TO LIST

Thank you

Thank you for your reaction!
Your reaction has been sent successfully. OK
팝업창 닫기

E-mail to a Friend now!

E-mail to a Friend now!

Thank you

Mail has been sent successfully. OK
팝업창 닫기